Ricotta gnocchi

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from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080611.wlcheffroggett11/BNStory/lifeFoodWine/home

[edit] RICOTTA GNOCCHI

What you need

  • 1 pound drained ricotta, as dry as possible
  • 2 whole eggs, cold and lightly beaten
  • 1/4 cup parmigiano reggiano, grated
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • Grated nutmeg
  • Salt and pepper

What you do

Using a rubber spatula, beat the ricotta until it is smooth. Stir in the eggs.

Add the remaining ingredients and mix in well, checking for seasoning.

On a large sheet pan, sprinkle a generous amount of flour, about a half-inch deep.

Using two soup spoons, shape the mixture into quenelles. (A quenelle is a culinary term for a small dumpling shaped like a football.) Drop each one gently onto the tray of flour, without allowing them to touch one another.

Once the tray is full, shake it gently from side to side so that each gnocchi is rolled and coated in flour. Lift the gnocchi out of the flour and place them on another sheet pan lined with parchment paper and lightly floured. The gnocchi can be cooked right away, but if you refrigerate them for an hour or so they will firm up and be much easier to handle.

Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil. (It is best to use a wide pot so that there is room for the gnocchi to float as they cook and rise to the surface.) Lower the heat to a simmer and gently slide the gnocchi off the paper into the water. Once they float to the surface, they will take about three minutes to cook.

Pour the finished beurre fondu into a large bowl. Now skim the gnocchi from the water, drain briefly and place them in the bowl with the sauce. Toss gently a couple of times to coat them and serve with a fresh tomato sauce.

[edit] BEURRE FONDU

What you need

  • 1/2 cup of unsalted butter, diced and well chilled
  • 3 tablespoons of water
  • Sea salt
  • Freshly ground white pepper
  • 2 tablespoons finely sliced chives
  • 1 tablespoon chopped chervil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley

What you do

Bring the water to a boil and gradually whisk in the butter a few pieces at a time, whisking continuously. Allow the sauce to come up to a simmer after the final amount of butter is added. Remove from heat and continue whisking gently until the pan has lost some of its retained heat. Add salt and pepper to taste, but don't add the herbs until just before serving. The sauce will hold well in a warm spot for hours, if need be.

Serves 6.

Keith Froggett is co-owner and executive chef of Scaramouche in Toronto.

[edit] Beppi's wine matches

Tangy ricotta, buttery sauce. This calls for a well-balanced white with acidity as well as good texture. Here's a good excuse to splurge on one of those expensive, formerly obscure Italian producers that are all the rage now. Examples: Pieropan Soave Classico ($17.80 in Ontario), Alois Lageder Chardonnay ($20.80 in Ontario), Feudi di San Gregorio Fiano di Avellino ($29.99 in B.C.) and Jermann Vintage Tunina ($71.99 in B.C.).

A good alternative would be any rich chardonnay with good acidity, such as William Fèvre Chablis Champs Royaux ($21.75 in Ontario; $29.99 in B.C.; $24.25 in Quebec).

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